Girls DA clubs announced

Discussion in 'Development Academy' started by vad, Jun 30, 2016.

  1. psyclone

    psyclone Member

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    So what?

    For 99.99% of players, high school is the end of the line. Maybe 100 players get invites to a any national camp each year, and even less actually make a team. This includes everyone playing ECNL or GDA.

    You aren't going to make the national team. You just aren't. Giving up the high school experience so you can "develop" is absurd. There may be other good reasons to give it up, but it is crazy to give up one of the funnest and most rewarding experiences of your soccer career just because US Soccer thinks something that is demonstrably false.

    By high school, for basically everyone, the development game is over. You might, maybe, possibly go on to play for your colleges (anyone want to bet how many of those players didn't play in high school). Holding out for the additional development (and it is completely unproved that development is what you will get), is crazy.

    You only live once. Live it well.
    • Agree Agree x 2
  2. Youth Sports Fun

    Youth Sports Fun New Member

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    The Beauty of that HS team is that many of them are/have played for ECNL clubs (High Level) that allow both. The coach is as high quality an individual as he is a coach!
  3. TJsoccer

    TJsoccer Well-Known Member

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    Sure about that? Breakin' was added to the youth olympic games....if it makes the prime time, the Lord of the Cardboard will return. The lycra tracksuit is vacuum sealed for freshness...just like my windmill.

    My point was off topic, but who cares...the forum is really slow. I'm saying that HS coaches should stay in High School and leave the ulittles alone....unless they want to change their approach. The boring, fitness based practices and weird tactics need to stay on campus. When I'm talking "development" (which is clearly an overused, ridiculous phrase) for ulittles, I just want them to be able to do the fun soccer stuff that kids enjoy. If this dude just did 90 minutes of scrimmage, it would be better than what we got. Dynamic warmup is a waste of time for 9-10 year olds. Ladders, hurdles, and hulu hoops are a total fun suck. And the Bobby Knight antics are a team killer...parents can't stand it. In HS, they are only accountable to the Athletic Director...but it doesn't work that way in Club.

    That said, I believe that HS sports are great for the High Schoolers and even better for the sport. The local media follows HS sports because of the built in support base from alumni. Watching a D1 commit tearing up a HS season brings excitement and recognition. The DA shouldn't be messing with that.
  4. soccercritique

    soccercritique Member

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    Agree @TJsoccer. High School and Club soccer serve two different purposes. High School is community based, representing school, town, student body and friends you've grown up with. It should be aright of passage for EVERY kid playing high school soccer to have their name called on Senior Night. Parents, players, school and community get to recognize the hard work a lot of these kids have done for 4 years both at HS and in club.

    The club approach to discouraging players not to play high school didn't only started with GDA, but has been going on for ages-well as long as I can remember my kid playing club. Club coaches are afraid that their player may get hurt playing HS because there's a lot of players that don't know what they're doing and may intentionally or unintentionally hurt a player. Okay I get that part. But to say that a kids skills will get worse is just plain stupid. They could however come back with some nasty habits, but that's an easy fix.

    The goal of clubs should be to develop players, put them in the best possible position to showcase their skills and prepare them to play in college, AND/OR just have fun with it. The year round merry-g0-round is a HUGE reason why these kids get hurt so much. I truly feel that the DA is worried that the rest of the world is catching up (and they are) so they want kids to stay in their club so that they can "train" and develop. A former club coach once said that if a kid doesn't have the tools by 14/15, most of the time, they'll never have it. There is the rare exception but for the most part this is totally true.

    I am totally pro-kid when it comes to playing high school. If the player and the parents think it's the best option, then go ahead. Now if you sign somewhere and your daughter/son's college coach says no, then i think you have to listen, but a lot of college coaches don't really care one way or the other.
  5. TJsoccer

    TJsoccer Well-Known Member

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    This article preaches to the choir, but local angle is cool...

    https://www.starsandstripesfc.com/2...0-womens-world-cup-symptom-bigger-ynt-problem

    In recent cycles, our YNTs have repeatedly passed over, or outright rejected, talented players who don’t quite fit U.S. Soccer’s preferred mold--all in the service of a style that the YNTs have yet to successfully deploy.
    Perhaps the most striking example of this curious approach to player selection is Tierna Davidson—rejected by the YNTs at youth level, but solidly entrenched with the senior national team before her 20th birthday. Despite excelling with Bay Area ECNL side De Anza Force, Davidson was never called into a YNT camp at one of the younger age groups. Nor did B.J. Snow ever call her into a U17 camp in the 2014 cycle. And in the 2016 cycle, Davidson was cut from the U20s after World Cup qualifiers and sent down to the U19s instead. Apparently April Heinrichs and then-U20-coach Michelle French thought she was not good enough for the U20s. (No, really.) Two years after that, Davidson was starting for the senior WNT.

    How did YNT coaches and scouts so comprehensively get Davidson wrong? It’s hard to say for certain. It’s worth noting, though, that some of Davidson’s particular strengths are her ease and composure on the ball and her passing under pressure. And these traits will be much less valuable in a side that tends to ask its centerbacks only to make very simple passes to a defensive midfielder or an outside back and let the front six take it from there, rather than joining in an effort to build from the back through the middle.
    ....
    None of these players, moreover, were obscure. None of them grew up in locations that don’t attract scouting attention. None of them played for small youth clubs (or small NCAA programs) for financial or other personal reasons. In other words, these players are just the most obvious, high-profile examples of players whose abilities were not properly recognized and cultivated by the powers that be. They are surely not the only ones.
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  6. soccercritique

    soccercritique Member

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    @TJsoccer speaks volumes. I get it...sometimes players develop later, or get overlooked because scouts are looking ONLY at perennial winners from perennial clubs. Granted, De Anza Force 98's were the number a top 5 team in the nation for as long as I could remember, I can tell you exactly why she wasn't picked...she's not flashy. She's not a Mercedes that's gonna look good and break down 2 years after you own it, she's a supped up Toyota with all the bells and whistles under the hood, but not flashy. And that's not disrespect to her-she's a bad ass in the back.

    I've said this for YEARS that the people making the decisions at the top have it all wrong and have put athleticism above technical ability. it's proven to be a good or rather great equation for success on the WNT..that is until recently. You see that other countries (top ones) are getting better every year, getting more athletic, more resources poured into their program, and most of all a lot more technical. That's because here in the USA, we value winning over development. Albertien was trying to do this with the U17's a few years ago and got fired because he didn't get the results. It'd be interesting to see an Albertin or a Deza (that type of technical coach) have TOTAL control to pick the players they wanted with no USA dummies having any say. It probably won't happen.

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