Girls DA clubs announced

Discussion in 'Development Academy' started by vad, Jun 30, 2016.

  1. wil4pres

    wil4pres Member

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    I dont believe the ECNL would agree with you "ne is showcasing talent for college with a sprinkle of ID and the other is to build for NT participation" i believe and their marketing pre DA was BOTH, just simply put we have the best players!

    It is interesting to see ECNL cry foul about the DA exclusivity when they themselves promote the same style, by excluding clubs and thus players. I frankly don't believe that the two programs are that different.

    Simple, one league with the highest level for these type of players and then everyone else
  2. soccercritique

    soccercritique Member

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    ECNL (from their website)
    About Girls Elite Clubs National League:
    The Girls Elite Clubs National League (Girls ECNL) was founded in 2009 to enhance the developmental experience of female youth soccer players in the United States through: (i) improving the competitive environment through creation of a true national competitive league; (ii) improving the process for identifying elite female soccer players through a systematic scouting and identification program based on national competitions; and (iii) improving the daily training environment at top female youth soccer clubs through developing best practices and training and organizational guidelines for its member clubs. The ECNL is sanctioned by US Club Soccer and is sponsored by Nike Soccer.

    id2/ECNL id2
    Held annually and becoming the most elite girls identification event in the country, approximately 90 of the nation’s top female youth soccer players are invited for one weekend to participate in training and competition.
    The ECNL/ id2 National Camp is free of charge for the players; the ECNL and Nike Soccer cover all of the costs associated with the camp, including hotel and ground transportation, meals, coaching, facilities, and equipment. The only cost for players is transportation to and from the camp. During the camp, the players have the opportunity to compete in front of top colleges from around the nation, are trained by some of the top youth coaches in the country, and learn from a series of off-field presentations from experts.


    Seems to me that they are in fact promoting the fact that they get to compete in front of college coaches. Nowhere is it mentioned that they train and have national scouts at the ECNL other than identification programs based on national competitions.

    GDA

    The Academy Program focuses on positively impacting everyday club environments to assist in maximizing youth player development across the country. The Academy values individual development of elite players over winning trophies and titles. The Academy sets the standard for elite environments for youth soccer clubs nationwide and is a part of U.S. Soccer's global leadership position in youth soccer that will impact thousands of players.

    Two distinctly different approaches, both which are good for girls soccer. Unfortunately, both bodies are too bull-headed to do whats right for girls soccer and combine both together.
  3. soccerislife

    soccerislife Active Member

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    Only replying to your last sentence since I agree with the rest. Right before ECNL was created they went to US soccer to see if they wanted part of it. US soccer said no thanks we don't need a league since we're dominant on the girls side right now. Let's put it this way, if ecnl didn't have great success their wouldn't be a girls DA today. Nothing to do what they need, it's about whose in charge.

  4. wil4pres

    wil4pres Member

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    All this is inclusive and excluding how many clubs?

    ": (i) improving the competitive environment through creation of a true national competitive league; (ii) improving the process for identifying elite female soccer players through a systematic scouting and identification program based on national competitions; and (iii) improving the daily training environment at top female youth soccer clubs through developing best practices and training and organizational guidelines for its member clubs. The ECNL is sanctioned by US Club Soccer and is sponsored by Nike Soccer."

    Where are they scouting, just ECNL clubs so again exclusive
    "
    approximately 90 of the nation’s top female youth soccer players are invited for one weekend to participate in training and competition.
    The ECNL/ id2 National Camp is free of charge for the players;"

    Again ~90 of the best players from what league or from where again, just the ECNL?

    So just becomes the net is a little bigger in ECNL than the GDA doesn't mean the mission is not the same.

    Now i don't know if they went to US Soccer or not i was not part of those discussions i doubt anyone here was THERE just a bunch of hearsay but i wouldn't doubt it. Lets just say marketing is marketing and both programs are being exclusive only to their members which i believe is not the best way to scout at all in this country.
  5. LivingTheDream

    LivingTheDream Member

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    Last edited: Aug 15, 2018
  6. Retired From Soccer

    Retired From Soccer Member

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    Thanks for posting that article. The reality is that "Pay-to-Play" is here to stay. The postings on this sight are proof that a lot of parents want to pay to play, they want exclusivity. They feel it works for their kid, therefore it works. The problem isn't necessarily pay-to-play. The problem is attempting to develop potentially elite athletes within that system. Kids with the potential and desire to be elite soccer players need to be identified early and removed from pay to play to train with other elite players and compete against other teams that are comprised of elite athletes. No, not PDP or ODP. I mean 100% of the time training with kids just as fast, just as strong. Playing against teams that are comprised of kids just as strong and just as fast.

    Every single team in our current Youth Competitive Soccer system consists of kids that range from potentially Elite to Mediocre. Coaches train their teams to be successful. They run training and develop a style that allows for the team to operate successfully as a group. The problem is that style and training are limited by the ability of the weakest players on the field. This is why the American Style tends to be very direct and it depends on speed and size as possession is fleeting. We need kids that can consistently run down and fight for 50/50 balls. The Mediocre players are pushed by the Coach but the potentially elite player languishes settling into trainings and a style of play well below what they are capable of. Under "Pay-to-Play" our performance will continue to deteriorate internationally.

    If we remove these kids to train them as elite athletes, who pays? This training has to be available to the athlete for Free or nearly Free. It will never be solely about ability otherwise. In Europe, Academies are run by the Pro Teams. When plays are signed, the Academy gets paid. Imagine a system where elite American Soccer Players are paid signing bonuses of which the Academy gets a %. Pro teams all over the world, icluding MLS and even top College must pay for the talent developed. Unfortunately, it takes a decade to develop a pipeline of talent that the world will pay for. Who is going to eat that cost for a decade? The MLS teams are financially weak by just about any standard. Maybe the Federation can afford to but they are in conflict as they rely on the pay to play system for money and they cannot offer a free alternative which pulls the very best players from the pay-to play system. So we muddle along, convincing ourselves it will improve. Parents believing it works for my kid so it works.
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  7. soccercritique

    soccercritique Member

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    The problem with playing with the strongest and the fastest at a young age is that athletes aren't close to being fully developed. How many times have you seen elite U9-12 kids and then everyone catches up and they're just average? I've seen it a lot over the years. I absolutely don't believe in the bio banding initiative that USSF is coming up with...it's a very stupid concept. But kids who maybe aren't as fast and more technical should get the same shot of training at an elite level because they may not have fully matured. American soccer is the way it is because it's win first mentality and it trumps development in most clubs. Clubs with bigger pools to pick from will take the biggest and fastest and play direct (as you say) and not really focus on being technical...why? Because they're winning and that's what parents who pay thousands of dollars want. People equate winning with getting that golden carrot (scholarships/national team/accolades) and put their kids in the best position to be "showcased".

    Pay to play is here to stay, because there's too much money involved and it's paying for DOC's houses in affluent areas (a little dramatic, i know) and disagree that there isn't a problem with the pay to play system. Many kids (both on the boys and girls side) can't afford the larger clubs that create exposure opportunities, and those that can offer financial assistance don't really promote it (cause they'll lose money). I really don't know what the answer is or how the culture in the USA will change. It's gonna take something drastic, like the WNT not making the cut (they almost didn't in the last WC) or our YNT's continuing to not have success like they had hoped.
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  8. Retired From Soccer

    Retired From Soccer Member

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    I definitely agree with the second part of what you are saying. Changing pay-to-play would be like changing the tax code. So many people are getting paid, the amount of resistance would to changing it would be tremendous. Even removing the best kids would be met with resistance. However, Families choose to pay, they choose to focus on the most positive outcome. No DOC forces them.

    I completely disagree with your initial point. The Academy pool would start large and shrink as kids and families wash out of the system. Only the cream remains. kids can always be added at later ages if recruited to do so. The Academy system is actually a ruthless system but families know where they stand in the Soccer hierarchy early. They can always enter the pay-to-play system if the wash out of the Academy. To play soccer very technically at pace requires an unbelievable amount of technical training from an early age. IMO, more then any other sport. Can a great athlete emerge after puberty to play Soccer at a high level? In America today, Yes but still the exception. Can one emerge to play at the level we are discussing (Internationally)? I would not say never, but it would be so rare as it would be foolish to build a development program around this possibility. The Academy is Free training. The standard is to find and develop a pool of elite soccer players. Should less athletic kids have access to this single minded training....No. Selection is based on ability and desire only which is the problem with having the Federation run such an Academy....Politics and Nepotism.. If parents want high level training for their kid that cant get in the Academy, then there is pay-to-play clubs available to them.

    There is definitely a win first mentally within the pay-to-play system which is just another problem of many with the pay-to-play system. The system is rewarded for engaging in this behavior. Parents drive this behavior not Clubs. Coaches find a way to win with the kids they got and the result is what you see. Direct, kick and run, overly aggressive high foul style of play. Either way. Pay-to-play will rarely develop great soccer talent by the International standard and if that is the objective, then the system will always fail no matter how much PDP, ODP, AD, ECNL we try to add on to it.
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2018
  9. soccercritique

    soccercritique Member

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    good points. But my main problem with the selection process isn't so much nepotism/politics (as much as it is rampant at the ODP/PDP/National selection), it's that you have kids that can't even trap a ball or connect more than 3 passes in a row. I mean it is getting better, much better but the technical kids are waiting for growth spurts to catch up. NT's like Germany and the Dutch have 2 national training teams and they relegate and move kids down according to measurable things. Not just the biggest and fastest. I think there are a lot of pay to play models that do a fine job of developing the kids in the system. I just think they are far and few between...and of course a lot of kids (just as athletic or technical) can't afford those programs. :(

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