06/07

Discussion in 'GIRLS GU10-19' started by SoccerBeast, Mar 14, 2016.

  1. SoccerBeast

    SoccerBeast New Member

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    They're out there, let's give them a thread =)
  2. Republic FC

    Republic FC Member

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    For like two years on the "old" Nor Cal Soccer Forum, the age group forums were totally janked up. They were probably off by two years and nothing was ever done about it. As a matter of fact, I think they were still that way the last time I checked. Anyway, it seems like the administrator here, Dominic, is pretty responsive so he will do something reasonably soon I would think.
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  3. SportsIAm

    SportsIAm Member

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    Shouldn't the age groups all be changed to be just U9, U10, etc. with the calendar year shift? Or maybe go by birth year 2006, 2007, etc. That way teams could be tracked as they age up, but it would be more work on the admin's part.
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  4. ole

    ole Member

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    I think referring to them by birth year makes the most sense.
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  5. ScottyBoy

    ScottyBoy Active Member

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    Birth year absolutely makes the most sense... since they change in the calendar year now. For example, the 2005 kids are U11 now in Spring League... but will be known as U12 for Fall ball. Am I correct in that?
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  6. Northbound

    Northbound Member

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  7. dk_b

    dk_b Member

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    @Dominic - how are you going to manage this in SoCal? Moving to birth years (rather than labeling "U-age")? It would seem to make the most sense.

    08G
    07G
    06G
    Etc.
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  8. Dominic

    Dominic Administrator Staff Member

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    Yes 06G, 07G....... makes sense. Probably another month till the change occurs.
  9. SoccerBeast

    SoccerBeast New Member

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    Anyone playing in Modesto in the morning?
  10. Hogger

    Hogger New Member

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    Glad to see this 06/07 board open up! My daughter is 07 playing on a small club. She is playing up at 06 at the Silver level and the DOC gives her time playing on the 04 team (05 team disbanded last year) which is at the Bronze level. Do you think it's better to stay with this club or try and move to one that's at the Gold/Elite level so that her teammates/opponents can better challenge her to get better? The coaches are great, she likes her teammates (and I like the parents), and team location is very convenient. And the DOC/coaches provide good mix of competition, skills building, keeping it fun, and try to challenge her with visits with the older teams. Of course I want to preserve the fun aspect, but also don't want to impair her ability to progress. And playing on the 04 team scares me a bit given the size differential, even though she's on the tall/strong end for her age. Perhaps keep her here for a couple more years and then try out for higher level teams when she's older?

    Thanks!
  11. C Zen

    C Zen Member

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    If your kid is getting extra playing time (and training time), and she seems to be improving her skills and having fun because of it (rather than feeling tired or sore), then it's probably better for you to stay with the club at least through the rest of this soccer year. I would be a bit concerned about having her play up 3 age groups in 04 because not only are the players much bigger (unless your kid is an early bloomer), they're also playing 11v11 on a bigger field, which at the Bronze level probably involves less passing and more just booting the ball.

    Take your kid to some of the summer tournaments that have Gold/Premier/Super divisions for the 07/06/05 age groups, and ask her what teams she likes and why. That will give you some clues as to which club(s) you should plan on having her tryout at prior to next soccer year.
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  12. Hogger

    Hogger New Member

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    Thanks C Zen. Yes, definitely sticking through this year. Only a few of her teammates play beyond the Fall season (and it's not the most athletic ones) so I expect the gap will increase each year. She is an early bloomer, but to your point I want to make sure we don't push her too hard - good point on the larger 11v11 field. Fortunately her DOC has same awareness and we're keeping all training with him...so he's aware how often she's playing.

    On a similar point our pediatrician was appalled that she played a full year of soccer. I tried to explain only Fall is a heavy schedule, Winter and Spring are moderate and Summer is light with 1-2 months of no soccer at all, and off-season practice is focused on skills with only short field scrimmages. But, she was having none of it. Other than US Soccer articles on recommended max hours of play per week, I am unable to locate advice on how to manage playing time across the year. Any recommendations or resources you all know of? Thanks!
  13. TJsoccer

    TJsoccer Active Member

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    I agree with @C Zen - Playing up can be dicey... but it sounds like you are managing it. Garbage soccer exists at all age groups. So, even if your kid is getting exposure to bigger, faster, stronger, they still might not be learning to make good decisions, receive passes, make runs, and play in space the way need to at higher levels.

    Did you pediatrician mention what the concerns were? Was it emotional or physical? Was it overuse injuries (shin splints, strains) or things like concussions and ACL tears? Was playing sports year around the problem, or just playing one sport all year?
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  14. C Zen

    C Zen Member

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    Simply Google search for "common youth soccer injuries" and you'll find plenty of studies and guidance for prevention.
  15. Hogger

    Hogger New Member

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    Thanks TJ. The pediatrician is concerned with overuse injuries associated with playing a single sport all year. She is fine with swapping out for another sport. Our daughter plays lacrosse and she was fine with that being the other sport during a soccer off-season. We live in Marin county and the pediatrician tells us all about extreme Marin families wearing out kid's arms in baseball, playing on multiple soccer teams, etc.

    Oh, and she was very very vocal on how tournaments are the worst. Too many games in too small a time period.

    C Zen, I read the articles under that search. They are helpful in the sense of understanding risks, but they don't prescribe a cadence for hours of play per week by age, which is what I am looking for. Maybe it doesn't exist.

    This article I thought was good in regards to monitoring your child's overall sports hours. The comments help fill out various frameworks. https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/2014...hould-youth-athletes-train-and-play-each-week

    But still, none seem to hit on whether to limit a single sport to only 9 months or x hours total in a year. Just looking for a benchmark to follow. I will discuss with our DOC but like to have alternative sources.
  16. TJsoccer

    TJsoccer Active Member

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    I read this book on the subject. It makes you think. Tournaments are problematic for me....especially those in the valley in the heat of summer.

    Warrior Girls
    Protecting our Daughters Against the Injury Epidemic in Women's Sports

    https://www.amazon.com/Warrior-Girls-Protecting-Daughters-Epidemic/dp/0743297563

    Amy Steadman was destined to become one of the great women’s soccer players of her generation. “The best of the best,?Parade magazine called her as she left high school and headed off to the University of North Carolina . Instead, by age 20, Amy had undergone five surgeries on her right knee. She had to give up the sport she loved. She walked with a stiff gait, like an elderly woman, and found it painful just to get out of bed in the morning.

    More girls than ever before are playing sports, and the gains they have made are worth celebrating. Girls tested on the athletic fields are happier and fitter, confident and prepared to take on the world.
    Warrior Girls exposes the downside of the women’s sports revolution, an injury epidemic that is willfully ignored because we worry that it will threaten our daughters?hard-won opportunities on the field of play. From teenage girls playing local soccer, basketball, lacrosse, volleyball and other sports, up to the most elite women’s teams, female athletes are suffering serious injuries at alarming rates.

    The numbers are frightening and irrefutable. Women tear their ACLs, the stabilizing ligament in the knee, at rates as high as eight times greater than men. Women’s collegiate soccer players suffer concussions at the same rate as college football players. From head to toe, female athletes suffer higher rates of a range of injuries, and many of them play through constant pain.
    Michael Sokolove leads readers through the most up-to-date research on girls and sports injuries. He takes us into the homes and hearts of female athletes, into operating theaters where orthopedic surgeons reconstruct shredded knees, and on to the practice field of famed University of North Carolina soccer coach Anson Dorrance.

    Exhaustively researched and strongly argued, Warrior Girls is an urgent wakeup call for parents and coaches. Sokolove connects the culture of youth sports ?the demands for girls to specialize in a single sport by age 10 or younger, and to play it year-round ?directly to the injury epidemic. He demonstrates how girls are both more vulnerable to injuries than boys -- andprobably tougher. Devoted to the ideal of team, and deeply bonded with teammates, they don’t want to leave the field even when confronted with serious injury and chronic pain.
  17. Hogger

    Hogger New Member

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    Yeah, tournaments seem to be a bit contrary to the idea that games should be used by coaches to better understand what they need to work on with individual players and the team in practice. But, my daughter loves the competition of tournaments and the downtime just hanging out with teammates. So guess I'll chalk them up in the "fun" category...even though hanging out in random towns for hours between games can sometimes be a drag...
  18. ScottyBoy

    ScottyBoy Active Member

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    Wow... your daughter is 8 and she's playing on an 11-v-11 with 12-year olds? I'm with C-Zen on this... which might be a first. I'd look for a solid club and start forging those relationships with players her own age and move up in the level of play. When I think of near teens playing at silver level, a rec soccer comes to mind in a hurry. If for no other reason, I think an elite level with her peers will bring superior training.

    It's time for you to join the insanity at an elite level where your '07 belongs. The nasty cliques... hate mail to your coach... not getting invited to BBQs with the cool families. Anything else deprives you of the misery all of us enjoy, and pay handsomely for, on an annual basis.
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  19. Hogger

    Hogger New Member

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    Ha! Elite sounds enticing ScottyBoy. She's 9 and we're a small bronze/silver club so nothing too crazy. Marin FC is opening a U12 next year so maybe we'll start looking at that like C Zen suggested.
  20. ballistic

    ballistic Member

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    That is so funny. The only team I can remember where none of the above happened was a silver-level u9 team at Rage. We are still friends with all of those families, though I'm sure the "hate mail to the coach" started happening as daughters moved up to higher teams! :) I know my intensity started racheting up.

    I am not sure about there being no distinction between silver level vs. rec, though (in a four-tier gold/silver/bronze/copper format, NOT a five-tier premier/gold/etc.). Especially at the younger ages.

    The coaching is almost universally much better at silver than rec, the players are better, the competition is better, and it seems to me that if you want your kids to have the skillset to play in High School (if they maintain interest that long) and hopefully stay out of trouble, then they have a much better shot if they play in silver than in rec. Mission High, in Fremont, for example, is full of silver level players, and it looks great on their resumes :)

    But I could be wrong, my kids are still young.
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